In the Press

Pentangle reunite again for exclusive summer performances and work on new material

Following their triumphant 40th anniversary reunion tour in 2008, the original members of Pentangle: Bert Jansch, John Renbourn, Jacqui McShee, Danny Thompson and Terry Cox – each one a legend in their own right – will reunite again to perform three special shows this summer. The band will appear at Glastonbury Festival on Saturday 25 June, as special guests at Cambridge Folk Festival on Saturday 30 July, and again at London’s Royal Festival Hall on Monday 1 August.

In addition, all five original members of Pentangle are currently working together on new material for the first time since they disbanded in 1973. The group also plan to release live recordings from the 2008 tour in the near future.

2008’s reunion tour was greeted with enormous and critical and popular acclaim:

    5 stars – “It’s an absolute joy to have them back”The Times
    “Every bit as accomplished and successful as those [comeback concerts] performed by Cream in London three years ago … Pentangle’s music sounded as fresh, vital and inventive in 2008 as it did back then in the first summer of love” Variety

In 2011 the original line-up of Pentangle play the following dates:

  • Sat 25 June: Glastonbury Festival
  • Sat 30 July: Cambridge Folk Festival
  • Mon 1 August: London, The Royal Festival Hall

Tickets for The Royal Festival Hall are available in person from the ticket office, Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX; by phone on 0844 875 0073; or online at www.southbankcentre.co.uk

Formed in swinging ‘60s London, Pentangle were one of the most exciting and innovative groups in the world, genuinely pushing boundaries and exploring new musical avenues. Simultaneously stars of the underground and darlings of the mainstream, they enjoyed an unprecedented degree of worldwide success for an acoustic band and their influence and musical impact is still revered and relevant today.

  • “Pentangle still rule the roost”The Times (9 February 2007)
  • “Forget Cream…or Led Zeppelin, this is the biggie: Pentangle is reforming”The Guardian (19 January 2007)
  • “The Folk Beatles…The greatest and most adventurous acoustic ‘supergroup’ of their time”The Word (April 2007)
  • “The godfathers of English folk music…unquestionably the core template for today’s blooming nu-folk scene”Metro (23 March 2007)
  • “Pentangle was electrifying, particularly at a time of unprecedented free thinking in music. Together they created an intoxicating instrumental force”Jazzwise (April 2007)
  • “Pentangle revolutionised 60s music”MOJO (April 2007)
  • “One of the most experimental and influential bands of the Sixties”The Sun (23 February 2007)
  • “Pentangle rewrote the Britfolk rulebook…America has nothing to match them”The Daily Mirror (9 March 2007)
  • “Britain’s Grateful Dead”The Guardian (16 March 2007)

For media enquiries: Mick Houghton Brassneck Publicity brassneckpr@aol.com
Follow Pentangle: www.facebook.com/pentangle, www.twitter.com/pentangleband , www.myspace.com/pentangle

Back after 34 years, Pentangle still rule the roost. Pete Paphides has the first interview with Britain’s finest folk band

Terry Cox, the group’s 69-year-old drummer, feels much the same. “Prior to this year, I hadn’t touched my kit for a decade,” says Cox, who now runs a restaurant in Menorca. “People have been trying to reassure me that it’s like riding a bike. But that’s no good really. I’ve never ridden a bike in my life.”

The Times, February 9, 2007

4 thoughts on “In the Press”

  1. Swa you play on the reunion tour, I grew up listening to your sound and really was inspired by your musical contribution to that genre. Anyway congratulations on your career….thats it really

    Oliver

  2. Dear Terry,
    Like many I loved The Pentangle. Your drumming seemed to have more importance for finding just the right effect insted of just laying down a beat or tempo that fit. What were some of your favorite studios you recorded at and what were they like? Just curious. Thank you, Kevin

  3. Hi, Terry

    Been a mad fan of The Pentangle since 68, loved the jazzy compositions you brought to the band (to balance the folkie and early music stuff) and thought you took much of the heart out of the band when you left the first reunion…what 85?

    Gerry Conway’s a great folk-ROCK drummer and fully deserves his success with Fairport and Jacqui’s pseudo-Pentangle – but I don’t know anyone who can get your ‘touch’. Back in 68-70, when I thought Joey Covington was a better drummer for Jefferson Airplane (another fave band) than Spencer Dryden, I couldn’t quite get your style. Now I just listen to your high-hats and the way you make those cymbals sing – so totally appropriate to whatever the pace is – and I just wonder!!!!! As for the way you wove a glockenspiel into it and could play melody on it while emphasising the beat…excuse me, but fucking hell!!!!!!! Perhaps the number that best encapsulates that for me is the BBC 69 recording of ‘Hunting Song’. On the opening the high-hat completely achors it while you pick out the basic melody.BRILLIANT!!!!

    Perhaps THE Terry Cox moment for me, though, was the 2008 Pentangle reunion tour…in Harrogate, when you perfectly sang Jacqui’s double-tracked 2nd part on ‘Once I Had A Sweetheart’ – absolutely pitch-perfect! How do you do it live and keep the beat? (Judging from the bootlegs, Joey Covington, for all his talents in several areas, couldn;’t!!!) I actually think your second vocal that night supercedes Richard Thompson’s solo on ‘Sloth’ at the 1989 Cropredy as my most awesome live moment.

    Studio samples of your harmony vocals that just blow me away include ‘Light Flight’ (of course!) and ‘Street Song’ (grossly underrated – but your vocals on that number, perhaps more than anything else on that first reunion album, anchor it back to the first incarnation.)

    Just wanted to show my appreciation of both your drumming and your vocals…and, yes, I still live in hope of a fourth Pentangle before you all get too old!

    As for the Bipolar, as well as being sad for the negatives, look for the positives. LIke Stephen Fry does. Could you have been such a creative musician if not for it…?

    None of that excuses the problems the illness causes but it can help everybody if you call all recognise both the pros and the cons of the illness. After all, wasn’t Winston Churchill Bipolar???

    I’m no expert on Bipolar by any means..but I do have a fairly expert and radical view on Psychology – see http://www.integratedsociopsychology.net If you think it might help, then do get in contact. If I could possibly help you, it would be such an honour, considering how much pleasure your music has brought into my life for so many years.

    Also love the girl vocal video on the site where your vocals take over for much of the second par of the number. So distinctive…such an extra layer!!

    Best

    Keith E Rice (keith@integratedosociopsychology.net)

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